Congratulations to Subir Bandyopadhyay of Indiana University Northwest

 

headshot of Subir Bandyopadhyay, professor in Indiana University Northwest's Department of Marketing
Subir Bandyopadhyay has been named the 2016-17 Distinguished Service Award winner at Indiana University Northwest.

We congratulate Subir Bandyopadhyay, professor in Indiana University Northwest’s Department of Marketing, on being the 2016-17 Distinguished Service Award winner. The award recognizes distinguished service by IU Northwest faculty and is designed to recognize substantive, significant and sustained activities across the academic career while a member of the IU community.

Bandyopadhyay also is the university’s representative on the IU Council for Regional Engagement and Economic Development. CREED representatives review proposals by IU entities for Regional Economic Development, or RED, Fund awards. His role as the IU Northwest representative on CREED is to promote economic development activities in the seven-county catchment area.

“I report salient economic development activities to the CREED meetings,” he said. “I also work with my colleagues to organize workshops and seminars to help small businesses and entrepreneurs with business-related issues. These initiatives are often supported by RED funds.”

Bandyopadhyay said small businesses generate more employment and growth than large businesses.

“One of the focal areas of CREED is to help promote small businesses and entrepreneurs,” he said. “For example, we organize workshops on critical business-related topics including social media marketing, digital marketing, business planning, marketing communication, and so on. These workshops offer vital skill sets to entrepreneurs to help them thrive in the business environment.”

Bandyopadhyay said he is honored that his service to IU, IU Northwest and the Northwest Indiana community during his 16-year tenure has been recognized at the university level.

“It inspires me to do even more than what I have accomplished so far,” he said. “I believe service is about giving back more than what you take. I will continue to serve with this belief in mind.”

Congratulations again, Subir!

IU-based startup The Bee Corp. publishes annual report on its social, environmental benefit

Ellie Symes, CEO of The Bee Corp., wears a beekeeper's hat and mask as she inspects a beehive's frame.

The Bee Corp., an agriculture technology startup founded by Indiana University alumni Ellie Symes, Simon Kuntz and Wyatt Wells, has published its 2016 benefit report to its website.

The Bee Corp. is a benefit corporation, which is a legal entity that allows business leaders to pursue socially and environmentally beneficial causes without violating fiduciary responsibilities.

As part of the commitment these companies take to pursue higher levels of purpose, accountability and transparency, benefit corporations publish an annual benefit report to highlight their achievements and challenges in creating a social benefit.

Among the highlights of The Bee Corp.’s benefit report are:

  • Supporting Beekeepers: “Our company benefits beekeepers by applying technology to improve beekeeping methods and reduce hive loss in order to ensure the practice can be passed down to future generations.”
  • Safeguarding Food Security: “Our company benefits society and the environment by protecting food security through restoring sustainable honeybee populations to fortify our agriculture production system.”
  • 2016 Initiatives:
    • Develop a model to begin preventing hive losses in 2017.
    • Formulate partnerships with companies dedicated to pollinators.
    • Secure pollinator-friendly hive sites to conduct 2017 research and development.
    • Build supply chain with companies that encourage sustainable practices.
    • Minimize the carbon footprint generated through business activities.
  • 2017 Goals:
    • Expand data collection and analysis from hives across the globe.
    • Translate hive data into actionable information to prevent hive loss.
    • Improve beekeepers’ response time for replacing a non-laying queen.
    • Minimize fuel consumption for hive management.

The complete benefit report is available on The Bee Corp’s website.

In 2017, the company was featured on the websites of R&D magazine, Agriculture.com, Xconomy.com, and Inside Indiana Business, among others. Its founders won the 2015-16 Building Entrepreneurs in Software and Technology Competition hosted by Indiana University’s School of Informatics and Computing and Kelley School of Business. A video about the company also is available online.

beehive's queen is surrounded by worker bees

Speakers at E2E Convergence to highlight industry, education know-how for workplace development

Photo of the IUPUI Campus Center at night.

A diverse group of speakers has been announced for the Education-to-Employment Convergence event taking place April 20 on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. This annual statewide forum focuses on ensuring a smooth education-to-employment transition for Indiana college students.

The speakers will provide insight regarding workplace-development programs around Indiana. Representatives from higher education, state government, workforce development and various industries are invited to learn, network and share best practices for producing more career-ready talent in Indiana.

The scheduled speakers for the third annual Education-to-Employment Convergence are:

* Liz Dunlap, senior vice president and chief human resources officer, IU Health.

* Jason Kloth, president and CEO, Ascend Indiana.

* Jill Lehman, vice president of administration and chief people officer, Ontario Systems.

* Nasser H. Paydar, chancellor, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

* Naomi Pescovitz, anchor and reporter, WTHR.

* Jeff Rea, president and CEO, South Bend Regional Chamber of Commerce.

* Bill Stephan, vice president for engagement, Indiana University.

Parking will be available onsite at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. The event will be held in Room 450 and begins with lunch and networking at 11:30 a.m. Kloth, the keynote speaker, is scheduled to address attendees at 12:05 p.m. The complete agenda and a registration form are available online.

Education-to-Employment forum takes center stage during interview on ‘Inside Indiana Business’

Joe Carley and Bill Stephan sit at a large desk opposite of Gerry Dick. A sign "Inside Indiana Business with Gerry Dick" hangs on the front of the desk. All three wear dark suit jackets and ties. A screen in the background shots a photo from a previous Education-to-Employment Convergence event.
Joe Carley and Bill Stephan of Indiana University speak with Gerry Dick of “Inside Indiana Business” about the Education-to-Employment Convergence forum to be held on the IUPUI campus April 20.

Bill Stephan, Indiana University vice president for engagement, and Joe Carley, Indiana University associate director for economic development, appeared on “Inside Indiana Business with Gerry Dick” to speak about the April 20 Education-to-Employment Convergence forum at the IUPUI Campus Center.

You can watch the five-minute interview online.

More information about the E2E event, including a link to make your reservation, is available online.

IU students, faculty and the public invited to April 19 presentation by AOL co-founder Steve Case

Portrait of Steve Case, chairman and CEO of Revolution LLC
Steve Case, chairman and CEO of Revolution LLC

Steve Case, co-founder of America Online, will speak at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business April 19 at 6 p.m.

His presentation, “The Changing Landscape of Entrepreneurship,” will take place in Room 2075 of the Hodge Hall Undergraduate Center, 1309 E. 10th St.

The event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

headshot of Donald J. Kuratko
Donald F. Kuratko, executive and academic director of the Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

“We’re thrilled to provide our students with this opportunity to meet and learn from someone so passionate about finding new pathways to success,” said Donald F. Kuratko, the Jack M. Gill Chair of Entrepreneurship and the executive and academic director of the Johnson Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation in the Kelley School.

More information about the event is available online.

Bill Stephan, Joe Carley to appear on Inside Indiana Business TV

Joe Carley and Bill Stephan sit at a large desk opposite of Gerry Dick. A sign "Inside Indiana Business with Gerry Dick" hangs on the front of the desk. All three wear dark suit jackets and ties. A screen in the background shots a photo from a previous Education-to-Employment Convergence event.
Joe Carley and Bill Stephan of Indiana University speak with Gerry Dick of Inside Indiana Business about the Education-to-Employment Convergence forum to be held on the IUPUI campus April 20.

Bill Stephan, Indiana University vice president for engagement, and Joe Carley, Indiana University associate director for economic development, will appear on “Inside Indiana Business with Gerry Dick” this week.

They will talk about the Education-to-Employment Convergence forum, which will take place April 20 at the IUPUI Campus Center.

WFYI, the PBS station in Indianapolis, will broadcast the interview Friday, April 7, at 7:30 p.m. WTIU, the PBS station in Bloomington, will broadcast it Saturday, April 8, at 4:30 p.m. The complete listing of “Inside Indiana Business with Gerry Dick” broadcast times is available here.

A news release about the Education-to-Employment Convergence forum is available here, including a form for education and industry leaders to RSVP for the event.

Photo of the IUPUI Campus Center at night.

The Combine celebrates innovation and entrepreneurship in Bloomington

Nearly 20 entrepreneurs and innovators from around the state have come together for The Combine, a two-day event at the Monroe Convention Center in Bloomington.

Innovate Indiana is one of the sponsors of the event, and we send best wishes to all attendees and speakers!

Beta testing to begin on The Bee Corp’s hive sensor software

beehive's queen is surrounded by worker bees

The Bee Corp., an agriculture technology startup founded by Indiana University alumni, seeks beekeepers who operate five or more hives to beta test its hive risk-assessment technology called Queen’s Guard.

Wyatt Wells, the company’s chief marketing officer, said, “Queen’s Guard alerts the beekeeper when it detects a non-laying queen. It monitors internal hive temperature, and we use an algorithm to assess temperature data in real time.”

More information is available here.

Bloomington startup swarms beekeeping industry

Ellie Symes, CEO of The Bee Corp., wears a beekeeper's hat and mask as she inspects a beehive's frame.
Ellie Symes, co-founder and CEO of The Bee Corp., inspects a frame from a honeybee hive.

Inside Indiana Business has profile IU-based startup The Bee Corp. in its most recent “Life Sciences INdiana” e-newsletter.

The article includes quotes from Wyatt Wells, the company’s CMO, and Jeff Singletary of RJ Honey, one of the company’s clients.

You can read the article here.

A Call to Invest Locally

headshot of Tony Armstrong, CEO of IURTC
Tony Armstrong, President and CEO, Indiana University Research and Technology Corp.

In a February 20 Wall Street Journal online article titled “How to Get Venture Capital to Places Left Behind,” Steve Case — the co-founder of AOL and chief executive of investment firm Revolution LLC — spoke about the importance of encouraging and developing startups across the United States, not just in California, Massachusetts and New York. Tremendous work is being conducted around the country, and especially in the Midwest, where researchers and startups are among the nation’s leaders in advances in the life sciences, information technology, energy and agriculture.

But these leaders must overcome an obstacle: financial support. When Case was asked about the lack of venture capitalists in certain regions around the country, he replied that usually there is money in those areas, but individuals and companies that could be investing in startups, aren’t.

Multiple problems stem from this lack of support. Companies without strong local backing, including investors’ mentoring and guidance, may struggle and close; jobs disappear; and local and regional economies become less diversified. Fewer jobs will be available for a highly skilled workforce, including recent statewide college graduates, some of whom will leave the state for better opportunities.

In the article, Case suggested another negative impact from a lack of local investment: It may lead other investors to believe that nothing of value is developing in those regions.

“It’s really important that local entrepreneurs get their initial support from local investors — I think that is a signal to people in other places,” he said. “If the people in Nebraska or Minnesota or Iowa or what have you aren’t investing in entrepreneurs, why should the folks in California or New York or Massachusetts pay attention?”

Amazing technologies are being developed and commercialized by established companies throughout Indiana. Warsaw has been dubbed “Orthopedic Capital of the World.” The global headquarters for Anthem, Cook Medical, Dow AgroSciences, and Eli Lilly and Company are located here, as well as the North American headquarters for Roche Diagnostics. Small companies and startups are creating solutions that impact people’s lives, as evidenced by the Genesys purchase of Interactive Intelligence and the Salesforce purchase of ExactTarget.

Sometimes these smaller companies and startups are launched from research conducted in the state’s — and nation’s — premier research institutions, including Indiana University, Purdue University and the University of Notre Dame. When these startups are founded, there is usually a history of state and federal government support of the basic research, often in the form of SBIR grants, STTR grants and matching funds. Usually there will be institutional support, perhaps from funds whose mission is to advance innovations and spur economic development — sources like the Innovate Indiana Fund, which promotes a culture of entrepreneurism within the Indiana University family by helping early-stage venture companies grow to the next level of success.

Local investment and support of our startups as they grow and develop high-wage, highly skilled job opportunities can positively affect the state. The support can include institutional, state and federal funding, but it must spread further into the private sector. We must develop more early-stage investment capacity in Indiana and encourage investment and mentoring locally, not only for immediate benefits to the state’s economic and workforce development, but also to show others that research conducted — and companies created — here in Indiana have an impact across the world.

Tony Armstrong is president and chief executive officer of the Indiana University Research and Technology Corp.